Scarves are elegantly versatile accessories and the perfect accent as we transition to Fall weather. Quick, easy and fashionable, you’re going to have a marvelous time sewing lots of DIY Scarves! Lawn, voile, silk, chiffon, double gauze and light-weight rayons are perfect for transitional scarves. Heading into cooler weather, think about flannel, lightweight wools, faux fur, fleece or plush fabrics like Cuddle.  A little yardage goes a long way. This may be the time for a little bit of that amazingly gorgeous, yet expensive piece you can’t stop touching at the fabric store. I see my scarves as handmade, luscious “temperature adjustors”. Too cool? Add a scarf. Too warm? Loosen the scarf or take it off.

DIY Scarves fringed finished

Fringed Scarves

Next to choosing fabulous fabrics, trims are the piece de resistance that will take your DIY Scarves from basic to ooh-aah. Fringe is still hot on the fashion scene and you can create an on-trend look with the DIY Scarves designed by Maya of the Little Treasures blog. For 45″ wide fabric, purchase about 1-1/2 yards and you’ll get two scarves – one for a gift.  Or, as Maya suggests, this can also be a clever upcycle for an existing scarf that needs a little spark!

DIY Scarves fringed stitching

Look for a 3″ to 4″ wide lace or fringe, measure the edges and add a few more inches “just in case”.  You may not want to sew trim to the neck unless it’s quite soft, so just the bottom and side edges will need to be measured. Maya wanted more of a fringe look to her trim, so she cut in between the lace motifs. This is a great idea, just be sure to try it on a sample so that you know it won’t unravel. Another reason to buy a few more inches than you need! Click here for the Fringed Scarf tutorial.

DIY Scarves lacy finished and on body

Lacy Girl Scarf

The Lacy Girl Scarf I found on the Pacific Fabrics site is very similar to Maya’s scarf. The Pacific Fabrics girls chose a lacy fringe for their DIY Scarves and stitched it around all edges. I love the extension of the trim beyond the points of the scarf. It’s a luxurious, romantic look that would add a bit of dress-up to a plain t-shirt and jeans. Instant Fall style!

Fringed Fall Scarf from WWD

Fringed Fall Scarf from WWD

The Pacific Fabrics pattern is a PDF and includes a hand-drawn pattern you can trace and tape together. If you’d like your scarf a little longer, just spread the two pieces out farther, add more printer paper in the middle and tape it for the length you want. For 60” fabric, you’ll need just 1/3 yard! Click here for the Lacy Girl Scarf PDF pattern.

diy-scarves-pom-pom-infinity-scarf

Pom-Pom Infinity Scarf

This awesome pom-pom trimmed Infinity Scarf has loads of stylish potential.  To duplicate this look, shop for a lightweight cotton, lawn, voile or double gauze and add coordinating poms. Mini poms would be super adorable, too, and you could add a stylish pop of contrast color to brighten those dark days headed our way!

Diane Von Furstenberg Double Gauze scarf

You’ll love this tutorial and the fabulously illustrated step-by-steps from the Better Homes and Gardens How to Sew blog. Just 2-1/4 yards each of fabric and pom-poms are all you need for this super-quick, super gorgeous infinity scarf. The fabric is doubled so you’ll have a little more warmth and there’s a neat little twist when you’re done. Click here for the Infinity Scarf tutorial.

DIY Scarves Fashion Faux Fur Scarf

Faux Fur with Faux Leather Fringe from the Polyvore site

I’ve included a few non-handmade scarf pictures to inspire you! As fashion great Carolina Herrara says “Money doesn’t buy elegance. You can take an inexpensive sheath, add a pretty scarf, gray shoes, and a wonderful bag, and it will always be elegant.” Use your creativity – experiment with different fabrics, varying trims, piecing fabrics and laces together. Search the web and make a DIY Scarves idea file. And, when you get that “Where did you buy that?” compliment, just wave your hand in queenly style and say with joy “Oh, this? I made this!”

 

About the Author


Annette Millard began sewing at the age of three, made her first dress at ten and is always happiest with needle, fabric and thread in her hands. Annette feels very privileged to have spent most of her work life in the sewing industry and loves teaching, making her own handmade wardrobe and writing about sewing. She spent over ten years as the newsletter and web site content writer for the Pacific Northwest's largest locally-owned family of fabric stores and is now thrilled to have the opportunity to share her passion for sewing with the Sewing Secrets community.

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